Archive | November, 2017

Don’t rule out private colleges

7 Nov

A former student of mine is now attending Dominican University of California in San Rafael on an athletics/academics scholarship that provides full tuition.

While the window of application opportunity may be closing by the end of this month for some public universities, most private universities are still accepting applications. There are many advantages to attending a private college:

  • Smaller class size
  • Opportunity to get to know your professors better
  • Better chance of getting the classes you need
  • Greater likelihood of being able to design a major of your own
  • Higher chance of graduating in four years — in fact, some four-year private universities guarantee this
  • And even though the tuition costs are significantly higher than those of public universities, often the private colleges have huge endowments from their alumni, so that you can get large scholarships and university grants. Because you can most likely graduate in four years (if you don’t mess around!), the overall cost may be the same as that for a four-year college. The oldest of our four children attended Biola University in southern California. There she got a leadership scholarship, was able to live in the dorm for as many years as she wanted, made wonderful friends, got a great job as an assistant to the English department’s dean, and received an excellent recommendation that got her a job teaching immediately after graduation. Our out-of-pocket was no higher than that for our other three children who attended public universities.Give private colleges a chance! Apply and see how the financial aid might play out.Any good news out there? Where have you been accepted to college thus far?

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Free money for college

1 Nov

Many states have grant programs that assist students with college expenses. Grants are money gifts that do not need to be paid back. In California a student who demonstrated financial need according to the guidelines is receiving the following this school year:

  • University of California: $12,630
  • California State University, $5,472
  • Eligible private colleges, $9,084.

If you do not live in California, do a search on college grant money in your state by Googling like this: “your state name + financial aid.” For example: “Oregon + financial aid.”

In California you must do two things to be considered for a Cal Grant, and requirements are similar in other states:

  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) between Oct. 1 and Mar. 2 (www.fafsa,ed.gov) — listing the schools for a Cal Grant FIRST.
  • Make sure your high school has submitted your Cal Grant GPA verification. Verify this with your high school counselor.

The California Student Aid Commission encourages all students to apply for a Cal Grant, even if they THINK their parents make too much money (for income/asset limits, http://www.csac.ca.gov/facts/2018-19_income_and_asset_ceilings.pdf.

It is possible that a family’s income picture can drastically change overnight — so it’s good to have the paperwork requirements in place if that happens.

See your counselor today for more information!

 

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