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Having trouble letting go?

24 May

If you are a parent and are struggling with the prospect of letting your high school senior go, this is a great book–The Joy of Letting Go by Vicki Caruana.

Give yourself a graduation present! It’s been a hard year, mom and dad! But he/she has made it! You’ve made it! And the future is bright for you all!

God bless!

Janet

https://www.amazon.com/Joy-Letting-Go-Releasing-World/dp/0781414679/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495648559&sr=8-1&keywords=vicki+caruana

How to GET that scholarship money you won

24 May

Yay! You got a scholarship! Congratulations!

I know what you’re thinking: “Now how do I get the MONEY?”

If you have received notice of a scholarship other than from your future college, you will want to make sure you keep track of how to access the money.

If you have more than one scholarship, make a chart (or separate file folders) with the following information:

Name and address of the organization.
Contact name at the organization and a phone number for that person.
Email address for the contact.
Amount of the scholarship
Requirement(s) to access the money
Date (if needed) to write for the funds

Typically, organizations require one or more of the following:

  • Proof of admission — a letter (or email notice) that you have been accepted to your college.
  • Proof of registration in a college or trade school — an official letter or online acknowledgement that you have committed to attend that college.
  • Proof of enrollment — online list of your courses or official notice from your college that you have enrolled in classes (most require full-time attendance, typically 12 units).
  • Official transcript of your completion of your first semester or first quarter.
  • A letter from you requesting the funds, with an indication of where to send the check.

Do not expect the organization to remind you to request the funds. That’s your job! Some organizations may actually CANCEL your scholarship if you do not request the money on a timely basis.

Additionally, while some organizations continue their payments from year to year, others may require that you reapply annually. Don’t expect the organization to remind you of the process or deadline.

And most importantly . . . handwrite a sincere thank you note on nice stationery and mail it as soon as you receive the initial news of your scholarship . . . do not even wait until you get the money.

Appealing financial aid offers

2 Dec

uc-berkeley-sproul-hall-sproul-plaza-occupy-uc-berkeley-7d9994-wingsdomain-art-and-photographySome of you may already be getting financial aid offers from the colleges to which you have applied — especially if you did your FAFSA early.

However, some of you may be disappointed with the offers.

Please know you can still plead your case with the financial aid office at those colleges. Do this with a letter addressed to “Financial Aid Officer” and include information that could improve your offer:

  • Information about a parent losing a job or being cut back to part-time.
  • Loss of a job you have had.
  • Information about high and unexpected expenses for situations your family has recently experienced, such as medical care or a car accident.
  • Death of a supporting parent or other close family member — thus creating loss of income or increased expenses.
  • Separation of your parents — so that you now only need report income for the parent with whom you are living (or who provides the greater amount of support).

It is helpful if the school counselor or administrator can write a letter authenticating your case.

Also, the letter may receive quicker attention if the school faxes your letter to the financial aid department(s).

Please don’t delay on this. Some money pots — such as work study — are limited, and colleges can only offer what’s available.