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Enjoy your last months

14 Feb

I’m sure that if you’re a senior you’re thinking, I can’t wait until this is all over!

With all the pressures of testing, college applications, senior projects, scholarship paperwork and interviews — it’s just challenging to be a senior!

I totally empathize! I well remember thinking I could not WAIT until I was done with chemistry and essays and long bus rides to and from school. And then it was all over.

The rest of your senior days will fly by — and then you’ll be sobbing on graduation day, because those days are gone and you will realize that you won’t be seeing your friends much anymore.

I often see students experience a form of grieving, actually, that they didn’t let their thought process slow down some in the last months, especially — those months when you are sharing the traditional senior activities. Prom. Senior show or play. Senior banquet. Senior project presentation. Baccalaureate. Senior trip. And then . . .  commencement and grad parties.

Open your eyes. Soak in the sights and sounds of the various characters in your class. Someday, believe it or not, you’ll look back on these days with fondness and even wistfulness.

I’m not in the least encouraging you to give in to senioritis tendencies. Nope, not at all. If you do, you’ll regret not doing your best . . . and could lose scholarships and even worse, entrance into your chosen school.

Yes, the college years are wonderful! However, the demands are even greater intellectually and personally. So, for now . . . enjoy the moments!

 

 

One GREAT resource and gift idea for graduation is this cute book. It’s available for pre-sale now and a perfect gift for both high school and college grads. 

Here’s a link: https://www.amazon.com/Life-Lessons-Grads-Graduates-Succeeding/dp/1683970462/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1518646938&sr=1-1&keywords=50+life+lessons+for+grads

Good deal for future teachers

1 Feb

Thinking about teaching? GREAT! There will be many teaching jobs available as the baby boomer generation continues to retire in the next handful of years.

Federal TEACH Grants can provide up to $4,000. To qualify you must do the following:

  • Be enrolled in, or plan to complete, coursework to begin a teaching career.
  • Maintain a cumulative 3.25 GPA or better.
  • Sign an agreement to serve as a paid, full-time teach in a high-need field serving low-income students.
  • Agree to teach at least four academic years within eight years of completing your program of study.

One caveat: If you fail to complete your obligation, the grant converts to an unsubsidized Stafford loan that you (the student) must repay with interest.

However, for those determined to go into teaching, the TEACH Grant is a great help.

For more info, you can go to this government website: www.studentaid.ed.gov.

 

I’m super-excited about this new book coming out with Worthy Publishing in April–a perfect one-stop-shopping idea for all the graduates on your list, both high school and college grads. It’s available now for pre-order and early delivery to you on all online bookstores, including here at this Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/Life-Lessons-Grads-Graduates-Succeeding/dp/1683970462/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517506230&sr=1-1&keywords=50+life+lessons+for+grads

How to earn $100/hour

5 Dec

Q: How can you earn one hundred dollars an hour or more as a high school senior?

A: Submit an application for every single scholarship for which you are qualified.

Q: How can you increase your chances of winning scholarships?

A: Study the organization that sponsors the scholarship and the kind of student that organization would choose to reward with a scholarship.

Before you start filling out the scholarship application, do some research:

  • Read all of the materials that accompany the scholarship application. Often the organization will give some history about the group and/or the scholarship.
  • Go to the organization’s website and read all about the organization.
  • Ask your school counselor or other adults about the organization.

Then, ask yourself these questions:

  • Who are these people?
  • Why do they give scholarships?
  • For what kind of student are they looking?
  • What kinds of qualities do they want to see in the scholarship winner?

For example, your local Rotary Club is part of an international organization made up of business leaders in communities. Rotary members focus on fund-raising so as to sponsor various community-service projects, which often include scholarships for local high school students.

You can imagine, then, that Rotary Club members may be looking for students who represent the best of their own qualities, especially leadership and a mindset that community service is important.

Because my daughter had done a lot of community service for her school — organizing a school-wide effort to paint student murals on exterior walls and to spruce up the girls’ bathroom — she was a natural for a  great scholarship from Lowe’s, the home improvement store.

As you work on your scholarship application for an organization, think about those qualities that you have and those activities you have completed that would appeal most to your audience — that organization’s scholarship review committee.

CAUTION: NEVER misrepresent who you are to a scholarship organization. However, you do want to relate on that application the best of who you are that will dovetail with that organization.

And remember . . . always complete every application for which you are qualified. You won’t win every single scholarship for which you apply, but you also will not win any scholarship for which you don’t apply.